No matter how experienced we are, we make mistakes, especially when it comes to cooking Lamb. Sometimes we ask ourselves, why is this meat so tough? Most of the time, we blame the meat, but maybe it is not meat’s fault! Perhaps because we cooked or treated it wrong.


Check out below the cooking mistakes we make, and remember, it’s ok to make mistakes. Cooking is a never-ending learning journey!


NOT CHOOSING THE PROPER CUT FOR A SPECIFIC DISH.

Each cut cooks differently because some muscles are more worked than others, so it’s essential to choose the appropriate cut of Lamb before you hit the grill, skillet, or oven.

CHOOSING BONELESS LAMB BECAUSE IT IS EASIER TO CARVE.

Bone is a flavor, and it’s packed with nutrients and collagen. Bones always infuse any dish—Brase, grill, stew, roast, make broth.

Many people opt for boneless roasts because they seem easier to work with, but they really shouldn’t.

COOKING LAMB STRAIGHT FROM THE FRIDGE.

Cooking cold meat can be quick to result in uneven cooking, with a well-cooked outside and an undercooked center.

MARINATING LAMB WITH ACIDIC INGREDIENTS FOR TOO LONG.

Lamb meat comes from young animals. As a result, Lamb doesn’t require a long marinating process as it is tender on its own. One of the biggest mistakes people make is marinating Lamb in yogurt or lemon juice for too long. The result is very mushy meat.

SKIPPING SPICES WHEN COOKING THE LAMB.

Dorper Lamb meat is very mild Vs. Wool Lamb. While Dorper Lamb meat can be cooked with minimum spices, other breeds, especially wool breeds, tend to be more Gamy. The spices not just help to dissolve gaminess, they are also very beneficial for your body.

COOKING THE LAMB INCORRECTLY.

You wouldn’t cook a brisket the same way you’d cook a steak, so it’s a mistake to assume you can cook every cut of Lamb the same way. Some cuts of Lamb are good for quick-cooking on the grill, but others do much better with a low-and-slow braise or roast.

OVERCOOKING THE LAMB.

The more you cook it, the more it dries out. Scientifically speaking, meat fibers contain water and connective tissue that turns into gelatin as the meat cooks. When the temperatures reach a certain point, that water starts to boil and eventually evaporates. The gelatin can keep the meat juicy and moist until a certain degree, but eventually, it will burst and leave your meat without any protection—the result: dry, chewy Lamb.

NOT USING THE THERMOMETER.

No matter how experienced you are, it’s really hard to tell when meat is done to your liking. You can set a timer and rely on a recipe for help, but each cut of Lamb is unique. The lamb chops you got may be thinner or thicker than the one from the recipe, and it’s even harder with larger roasts like a Leg of Lamb. Instead of using time as a guideline for when Lamb is finished cooking, try using a sure-thing: a meat thermometer.

NOT LETTING THE LAMB MEAT REST.

One of the biggest mistakes we make is not letting the meat rest.When meat cooks, the proteins and fibers inside the meat seize up, release moisture, and become firm.

Those fibers can relax during the resting time, reabsorbing the moisture they expelled during the cooking process. If you cut into your Lamb straight away, those juices would spill out onto the cutting board instead.

SLICING THE LAMB INCORRECTLY.

No matter how well your Lamb is cooked. If you cut it incorrectly, you’ll end up with tough, chewy meat — even if you cooked it perfectly!The advice is always to cut the meat across the grain.


So these are the most common mistakes we all make when it comes to cooking Lamb. Maybe you already know some of them, but if not, I truly hope it will help your future cooking.

Sincerely,

Albina

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